Fatma Aliye Topuz (1862-1936)

She was born in 1862 in Istanbul. Topuz could not receive any formal education but she managed to educate herself by eagerly listening private lessons that her older brother taught. When she was 17, she married to Faik Bey and had 4 daughters from him. Continue Reading

Halide Edip (1884-1964)

Halide Edip was born in 1882. She became one of the symbols of independent Turkish women in Independence War period and the early modernist period in Turkey. In 1893, she started studying at Uskudar American Girls’ College. She was very fluent in English and her Continue Reading

Ekaterine (Keke) Melikishvili-Meskhi (1854, Tbilisi – 1928)

Ekaterine (Keke) Melikishvili – Meskhi was among those first Georgian women who obtained higher education in Switzerland where she joined the association Ugheli established by Georgian students in Zurich. Along with Keke Melikishvili, the association included other Georgian women too: Kato and Olimpiada Nikoladze, Olga Guramishvili, Pelagia Continue Reading

Maria Vasilevna Trubnikova (Ivasheva) 1835 – 1897

Her father, Vasiliy Ivanov, was descended from a very large and wealthy noble family, and her mother was the French woman Camilla Le Dantieau. She was the daughter of the governess in the family of a General – Major P. Ivashev. At first, she lived Continue Reading

First female translators and their role in the transfer of knowledge (Bulgaria)

During the Bulgarian Revival, translation was evolving rapidly. In its field, 10.9% of the booksellers, or 449 people, translated school, artistic and scholarly literature from Russian, Greek, French, Old Slavonic and Turkish. In the same period, the first 10 female translators with secondary education appeared Continue Reading

Mara Belcheva (1868-1937)

Born in Sevlievo, in a wealthy commercial family. She studied at the Vienna Higher Institute of Girls. Teaching in Ruse and Sofia, and after the murder of her husband, Minister Hristo Belchev graduated German literature in Vienna. Belcheva is one of the first Bulgarian poetesses, Continue Reading

Emerging female participation in the public sphere: first women schools, female high schools, access to university: the presentation of the female teacher in the 19 century (Bulgaria)

The first evidences of Bulgarian female education are from the end of the 18th – early 19th century, when the idea still had no social support. At that time, the girls were trained by nuns in few monasteries. (Anastassia Dimitrova) Only in 1841, in occasion Continue Reading

Eliza Pasternak-Vladigerova (1869-1952)

Born in Odessa, in a Jewish family. Graduated in Medicine in Paris (1897). Specialized in Obstetrics. Married a Bulgarian. Doctor in Varna and Shoumen, school doctor in Sofia (1905-1912). Working at the Private Gynecological Clinic of Dr. Paul Strassmann in Berlin (1912-1932). Translator.

Ekaterina Karavelova (1860-1947)

Born in Rousse in a poor family. She graduated from a female high school in Moscow. She had been working as a high school teacher in the Rousse, Plovdiv and Sofia female high schools. Translator of French and Russian, writer and journalist. Wife of Petko Continue Reading

Bogdana (Josepha) Iraskova-Hiteva

Born in the Czech lands, she graduated from a pedagogical school in Prague. Married a Bulgarian, became a teacher in female schools in Karlovo, Kalofer, Pazardjik, Vidin, Samokov, Tarnovo, Stara Zagora, Plovdiv, Varna, and Sofia (1867-1903). She was a member of women’s societies, translator and Continue Reading