Olga Sergeevna Lebedeva (1854–after 1912)

Olga Sergeevna Lebedeva (née Barshcheva; Russian: Ольга Сергеевна Лебедева 1854–after 1912) was one of the first to introduce Russian literature to Turkey. She is recognised for her pioneering contributions to the literary networks between the Ottoman and she Russian empires at the end of the 19th century. Lebedeva attended Kazan University, studying Continue Reading

Nadezhda Vasilievna Stasova (1822-1895)

Nadezhda Vasilyevna was the daughter of a dvoryan architect. She was born in the palace in Tsarsko Selo and her godmother was Empress Elizaveta Alekseevna, wife of Alexander I. Since she was a child she was surrounded by books and works of art. According to Continue Reading

Institutions of women’s memory in Bulgaria: museums, archives, collections, feminists walks on places of women’s memory

After the First World War  anniversary celebrations became a common practice. They were gradually replacing the other “realms of memory” – the monumental ones, the topographic ones (museum expositions and archive collections) and the functional ones (memoirs). Within this framework were also the “personal” anniversaries Continue Reading

Discussions about the social roles of women and their participation in public life during 19 and 20th century in Bulgaria

The Section of Women Lawyers at the BAUW was formed in 1928. It turned into the biggest corporate organisation of the Bulgarian women’s elite, with about a hundred and fifty members during the 1940s. It built up structures in the country. The interest in it Continue Reading

Participation in scientific conferences, congresses and other forms of academic life (Bulgaria)

The Bulgarian scientific societies, created by men, worked up to the 1920-1930s as a fully “male space”. The acceptance of women in them began after the World War I and was most active in the 1920s. There was a trend for easier entry of women Continue Reading

Famous bulgarian feminists and their participation in the International Women organizations and congresses, especially in the International Association of the University Women

Right after the founding of the Bulgarian Women’s Union, its representatives established relations with international feminist organizations. On behalf of the Union, Jenny Bojilova-Patewa and Irina Sokerova took part in the congresses of the International Alliance of Women and the International Council of Women resp. Continue Reading

Female charity societies and the spread and transfer of social knowledge (Bulgaria)

Women’s societies were a consequence of the development of secondary female education and the formation of literate Bulgarian women. The process of their creation was different from the Western European, because in Bulgaria the female education preceded feminism. The first society was founded in town Continue Reading

First female translators and their role in the transfer of knowledge (Bulgaria)

During the Bulgarian Revival, translation was evolving rapidly. In its field, 10.9% of the booksellers, or 449 people, translated school, artistic and scholarly literature from Russian, Greek, French, Old Slavonic and Turkish. In the same period, the first 10 female translators with secondary education appeared Continue Reading